Monthly Archives: February 2014

Tweets, Tweeting via Twitter @vermontkkids123

My students are amazing and brilliant!  We continue to explore twitter daily to connect, enrich and collaborate with our friends.  My students are benefiting from our daily conversations that we have with a variety of people.

How?  Together we are modeling “how to” have an online conversation in a safe, kind and responsible way.  We are also experiencing what it means to be a mentor and also how we are developing a learning community.  Our learning community is fluid and changes depending on what is tweeted and if we connect.  What I enjoy about this experience with my students is the dialogue and how we begin to “look” at twitter throughout the day.  I simply say:” Let’s see what others in the world are doing today!”  Through this simple dialogue and comment we begin to connect and share with others.

Exploring social media with my students has opened up a new perspective and given us opportunities to “see” the world globally.  While posting on our kidblogs my students made a connection with the map of the world.  They were so interested in where people were in the world and that they were sharing our learning.  kidblogThen we made a connection with another map of the world that appears inside our classroom and also on our class blog.  What do all these virtual and real face to face maps have in common?  They represent where we are connecting, how we are connecting and how we are not only sharing our learning, but modeling how to be safe, kind and responsible digital citizens.

Later during a reader’s workshop time one of my students makes a text to world connection.  She sees a map in a book and recognizes it.  I then have an opportunity to have a conversation about not only her connection, but why the map may be in the text and what it’s purpose is.text to world conn

One of our classroom connections on twitter is @vtfirsties.  Through our conversations we have been able to inspire, be mentors and learn from each other.  Our latest tweet from them. Screen shot 2014-02-14 at 10.55.02 AM

Now my students begin to experience how their ideas inspire others.  Through this experience we begin to connect and collaborate.

This past week I asked my students how we share our learning with the world.  These are some of the responses.

1. Take a picture and post it to Twitter
2. Take a screen shot, post it to Twitter and Tweet it
3. Just describing on Twitter what you wrote about
4. Post it on our Kidblogs
5. Take picture and put it on our classroom blog to share
6. Skype and share our story

Screen shot 2014-02-14 at 11.21.20 AM

We connected with @kindertweeten, in Chicago and we discovered that we were both creating “How To” stories.  Now we have an opportunity to share our work!  Through this modeling we celebrate our writing as well as share with a larger audience.  The positive commenting inspires us to not only write more, but share!  The impact is so positive in regards to writing.  It helps us feel successful and willing to take risks.dld 1

As a teacher this gives me an authentic picture of my students understanding about not only that they share outside of our classroom, but the specific tools that we use.  We are beginning to explore the world in regards to our learning and how we connect and what we have in common as well as other perspectives.  My students really enjoy the positive feedback that we experience.  Through this positive conversation via twitter we become connected and engaged with our learning.  We are learning side by side with other students and their amazing teachers about “how to” use social media to connect, collaborate, get inspired and have conversations about our discoveries.

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The Value of Conversations

Last spring I had the honor of participating in a panel discussion with Steve Hargadon and other amazing educators at the Dynamic Landscape Conference at Champlian College in Burlington, Vermont.  Prior to this panel discussion I first met/heard Steve speak through a prerecorded Google Hangout created by Lucie Delabruere and Charles Wilson.  It was an amazing conversation.  Steve shared with us about the importance of having conversations and being open to what they can reveal, inspire and the value of face to face conversations.  This has had me thinking deeply for awhile now about how I can not only have meaningful conversations, but how this might look and sound like for me professionally and with my Kindergarten students and their families.

View the panel discussion…..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUVRPyR4Ot0&list=PL1oMB99j4uZZYwb3EjI2YKk_CzLOx3mr_&index=1

What has happened so far….

1. Twitter:  My students have “conversations” through threaded tweets about ideas that we find interesting, curious about or that we connect with.  The blue lines help my students visualize how our ideas, words are connecting. My students parents are also tweeting us as well and asking us questions about ideas we have explored.

2. SKYPE: Skype has been an awesome tool for us to use to have face to face conversations with others outside of our classroom.  This tool has only enhanced and enriched our thinking and we have developed a very positive and kind online etiquette as well because of how we use Skype to converse.

3. SpeakPipe: This is a great gadget that I found out about thanks to Karen Lirenman. I put this on our science blog.  Some parents leave questions and comments about scientific ideas we are exploring.  I have also had a few educators leave comments and questions for me as well.  This is great because I am then able to continue our conversation via Skype or Google Hangout.

4. Blogging/Kidblog: Blogging is an amazing platform to share and reflect.  My students experience commenting and giving compliments as another way to “speak” about what they are discovering.

5. Google Hangout: This is an amazing tool that can bring people together to have a conversation regardless of where you are.  I have used this tool with students, other professionals to share their ideas, have conversations and get help and advice.

6. Oral Language: I have created an Important Word Tree in my classroom where we post new words that we begin to explore and use everyday in Kindergarten.  This has been an amazing opportunity for me to capture and enhance the words of my students as well as offer them other words that mean the same thing.  For example in kindergarten we are not talking, but having conversations.  This has really raised the level of vocabulary not only being used, but how my students are beginning to strengthen and develop their oral vocabulary and understanding.DSCF3067

So because of my experience last spring I was inspired, my views and perspectives were challenged and I made some new connections with other inspiring educators.

I learned about how conversations can be experienced in a variety of ways and some of the tools that can make this possible.

One of the things that I enjoy most when I meet new people is what their story is, their experience and what they have discovered.  This offers me an opportunity to stay connected and know that these connections are always there and available.  The technology does not replace ideas or opportunities to have face to face conversations, it captures, connects and enhances our stories.

Who are these amazing educators?

You can find these educators on twitter.  They are: @stevehargadon @alanfletcher4 @babbitjoyce @nissakauppila @mattallenedu @techsavvygirl and @chaswilson.